morning shadows

Do me a favor this morning. Draw the curtain and come
  back to bed.
Forget the coffee. We’ll pretend
we’re in a foreign country, and in love.

Raymond Carver, last stanza of “The Road”

Helen Lundeberg, Islands, 1986. Acrylic on canvas, 127 x 127 cm.

There’s an urgency when you wake up in darkness. Instinct tells you to trust that light is coming. The sky opened a hazy lilac. Morning shadows sharpen. I’ve misinterpreted the danger inherent in matter cannot be created nor destroyed. Navigating productions, stilted formations misunderstood as lyrical responses, becomes a performance. Often, soothing a distraction.

I learned early that soft touches were to be saved for moving someone to confession, then towards salvation. For all those end-of-days Sunday warnings, I am not prepared. This is a special kind of denial, an abject version of faith.

“We should have known” has signaled subtle shaming. Didn’t you hear all those rumors?

The moon is new. At the moment, there is no wind. My body remembers this fear. My sense of distance expands in the pink layered light.

I’ve kept this on the tip of my tongue, at the rim of my mouth, inside my lungs sweet like a curated secret. I tried to write around the noise but this is the silence that found me.

red flag warning

Who will touch me in the middle of this war. — Zaina Alsous, from “On Longing,” A Theory of Birds: Poems

Luis Camnitzer, vacuum formed polystyrene, 1968

in the darkness, I whisper
red sky at night
sailor’s delight

this ancient prayer breaks
its positive predictive power
when the sun rose red, again
highly sensitive weather machines
translate falling ash as snow and rain
smoke spreads heavy in the amber colored night
in the darkness, I whisper
red sky at night
sailor’s delight

competitive sacrifice

15 October 2018, Portland, OR

I.
it is the second day of spring
another war sprouted Tuesday
stacked on top of other conflicts
grocery store aisles absorb
decreased customer enthusiasm

in the beginning, even the worst mothers are forced to love unconditionally

II.
maybe there can be no peace
without bravery, sacrifice, loss

all corporations are managed at the state level

III.
I dreamt you had died

quiet forever
wanting nothing

in the morning
you were there

as if thought could not perform existence

IV.
it is the first day of winter
think about how much space light takes

graceful friction

But where I come from withdrawal is easy to forgive. — William Stafford

Rupprecht Geiger, Zu Licht und Schatten (trans. To Light and Shadow), acrylic on plastic foil, 40 x 35 cm, 1972

She said she loved me
she loved me
loved me
it became an anthem
a melodic hook
stacked like clouds
fists tucked
ready for a fight
bent over     or
how horizons form
don’t believe me
study the moon
and sun’s partnership
a story of graceful friction
literally magnificent light
now wild from abandon